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Archive for the ‘Digital Cameras’ Topic

2014.11.27

Today, Sony announced their newest and most ambitious mirrorless digital camera yet. When Sony launched their NEX system, they originally said that image-stabilization could not be implemented in-body due to size constraints. At the time, the system was restricted to APS-C (1.5X FLM) sensors. They later introduced Sony E-mount full-frame mirrorless models, also without stabilization.

Now, after a collaboration with Olympus which took sensor-shift stabilization to 5-axis for use in their OM-D E-M5 reviewed here, Sony did it. The new Sony Alpha A7 II is a full-frame E-mount mirrorless digital camera with built-in 5-axis image-stabilization, yet it is not much larger than the original A7. This alone is an incredible technological achievement which unleashed a huge potential for full-frame mirrorless cameras.

Sony Alpha A7 II

The A7 II features a 24 megapixels CMOS sensor with 5-axis in-body image-stabilization and on-sensor 117-point Phase-Detect AF. Although not confirmed by Sony, the A7 II most likely uses an anti-alias filter, just like the original A7. Dare we expect an A7R II soon? And even A7S II? Both are highly likely. The Sony A7S, being one of the most capable low-light cameras on the market, would take an incredible leap forward with 5-axis stabilization.

A refined body which includes triple control-dials, a deeper hang-grip and 5 customizable buttons takes the A7-series to a new level. As its siblings, the A7 II features an incredibly sharp 2.8 megapixels EVF with 100% coverage and 0.71X magnification. The EVF has an Eye-Start sensor and is Exposure-Priority which Sony calls Tru-Finder, making it much more usable than most electronic viewfinders on the market.

This new mirrorless retains the main features of its predecessor, including an ISO 100 – 25600 sensitivity range, expandable to ISO 50 – 51200. The shutter-speed remains at 1/8000s – 30s using a front-curtain electronic-shutter to achieve an extremely short shutter-lag. There is a multi-interface hot-shoe with a flash-sync speed of 1/250s.

Sony Alpha A7 II

The Alpha A7 II is aimed at professional photographers with its large full-frame sensor in a weather-sealed body with a huge number of direct controls, not counting the triple control-dials already mentioned. A traditional mode-dial and dedicated EC dial, marked in 1/3 EV increments, leave all major camera controls within easy reach.

The Sony Alpha A7 II is scheduled to ship next month for a retail price of $1700 USD. This is an impressively low-price for any full-frame digital camera, even more so when considering its 5-axis stabilization which is unique in its class. Adorama and B&H Photo are already accepting pre-orders. Get yours quickly as we expect this model to fly off the shelves!

Neocamera Blog Neocamera.com © Cybernium

2014.11.11

Neocamera just published an express review of the Nikon 1 J4 mirrorless. This is Nikon’s latest entry-level mirrorless featuring an 18 megapixels high-speed CMOS sensor with built-in Phase-Detect AF at 105 points and Contrast-Detect AF at 171 points.  The high-speed sensor with electronic-shutter gives the J4 ultra-fast capabilities such as 1/16000s maximum shutter-speed, 60 FPS continuous drive at full resolution and high-speed video up to 1200 FPS, albeit at reduced resolution, compared to the full 1080p HD at 60 FPS which it can also do.

Nikon 1 J4

Along with the J4, Nikon introduced a Nikkor 10-30mm F/3.5-5.6 PD-ZOOM VR lens which collapses and is self-capping. It features a smooth fly-by-wire focus ring. Together this keeps the J4 incredibly compact while providing a relatively large 1″ (2.7X crop) sensor, which is much larger than the majority of compacts yet smaller than most mirrorless.

Read on the review to found out how the Nikon 1 J4 balances the compromises of image-quality, speed and size.

Neocamera Blog Neocamera.com © Cybernium

2014.10.27

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 is the smallest mirrorless digital camera with a Four-Thirds or larger sensor. This incredible camera packs a 16 megapixels  LiveMOS sensor and remains smaller than most premium compacts while providing a similar feature-set. Full manual-controls, including custom white-balance, spot metering, bracketing and manual focus are all there. When paired with Panasonic’s Lumix G 12-32mm F/3.5-5.6 OIS collapsible lens, it makes for a versatile and highly compact package.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1

 

This small digital camera offers a 3″ touchscreen LCD with 1 MP to complement its single control-dial body. Still, it manages to pack a reasonable number of buttons and both a traditional mode-dial and focus-dial. Plus, it includes built-in WiFi. The GM1 is in fact surprisingly powerful. Find out why and how much in Neocamera’s full Panasonic GM1 review.

Neocamera Blog Neocamera.com © Cybernium

2014.10.09

The latest Fuji premium compact, the Fuji X30 has just been reviewed at Neocamera. This evolutionary update in its series brings in an exceptionally large and sharp EVF with 2.8 MP, 0.65X magnification and 100% coverage. It offers a revised control layout with the second control-dial as a ring at the base of the lens barrel, promising improved ergonomics and usability.

This premium digital camera retains the outstanding features of its predecessor. Notably, its bright wide-angle 28-112mm F/2-2.8 lens with mechanical zoom and the 12 MP 2/3″ X-Trans CMOS II sensor with built-in Phase-Detect AF. With already known image-quality and performance, expectations for the Fuji X30 are high. Read the review to find out how it ultimately performs.

Neocamera Blog Neocamera.com © Cybernium

2014.09.17

The new Canon flagship ultra-zoom features the most powerful optical zoom on the market. Its 65X range covers focal-lengths equivalent 21 to 1365mm, going from the widest to the longest reach of any fixed lens digital camera. This is paired with a 16 megapixels 1/2.3″ CMOS sensor to keep a size similar to its predecessor.

Canon Powershot SX60 HS

The Canon Powershot SX60 HS is bridge camera with full manual-controls, including manual-focus and custom white-balance, plus choice of metering patters, including Spot. The high-speed CMOS sensor can shoot continuously at 6.5  FPS and record full 1080p HD video at 60 FPS. It has an ISO 100 to 3200 sensitivity range with an expanded ISO 6400 setting in Low-Light mode.

In addition to a 3″ LCD, the SX60 HS has a built-in 920K pixels EVF, the highest resolution one on a Canon camera to date. Only a handful of ultra-zooms have such high-resolution viewfinders lately, mostly from Fuji, but the technology has been around since 2004 when it was introduced by Konica-Minolta on the Dimage A2. That one even has an Eye-Start sensor which is  unfortunately lacking on the SX60.

The incredible lens of the Canon Powershot SX60 HS is capable of focusing down to 0 (yes, zero) centimeters from the lens, providing for the ability to capture extreme close-ups.  At the long end, it can focus down to 1.8m which is still every impressive considering a 1365mm-equivalent focal-length.

The Canon SX60 HS is scheduled to be available next month for $549 USD or $579 CDN. Adorma and B&H Photo are both already accepting pre-orders.

Neocamera Blog Neocamera.com © Cybernium

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